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CINEMA ON THE SQUARE

Audience vote

A LONG HAPPY LIFE
Director Boris Khlebnikov
Russia, 2012 ., 16+

SOULLESS
Director Roman Prygunov
Russia, 2011 ., 18+

KOO! KIN-DZA-DZA
Directors: Georgi Daneliya, Tatiana Ilyina
Russia, 2013 ., 6+

LEGEND #17
Director Nikolay Lebedev
Russia, 2013 ., 6+

METRO
Director Anton Megerdichev
Russia, 2012 ., 16+

Special screening

PLANET OCEAN
Directors: Yann Arthus-Bertrand, Michael Pitiot
France, 2012 ., 12+

THE DYATLOV PASS INCIDENT
Director Renny Harlin
Russia/USA, 2013 ., 16+

THREE CHAMPIONS ON THE FAR COASTS
Director Konstantin Feoktistov
Russia, 2012 ., 0+

THE PACKED
Director Petr Gladilin
Russia, 2012 ., 16+

I'LL NEVER FORGET YOU
Director Rano Kubaeva
Russia, 2013 ., 12+



OH, WAR, WHAT HAVE YOU FOUL THING DONE?

In the mid 1950s, after the death of a certain highly effective manager, the cultural life of the Soviet land suddenly started to fill with various types of discussions. These discussions, of course, did not shake the foundations, but the general thick-headedness somewhat softened.One of the most resonant discussions was the debate about the war. “Globe or local map”, was the basic article to which participants referred and about which they argued. It is probably not necessary to explain what a globe is. But it is worth remembering the local folding map: a small map, carried in a belt pocket by junior and middle commanders – those who lived in the trenches, who led the soldier into the battle.Immediately following the Victory, the war would be shown from the point of view of the Supreme Commander in Chief, who would think on the scale of the planet, moving armies and divisions in a direction only known to him. The three-hour epic of 1949, “The Battle of Stalingrad”, was filmed from these positions, and today it is only possible to make people watch it on a court order.The films made after this discussion were of the “local” type: “The Ballad of the Soldier”, “The Cranes are Flying”, “Fate of a Man”, and “Ivan’s Childhood” were included into the spiritual history of our society, because they showed the improbable manifestations of formidable human lives in the war and around it, asserting in artistic terms the correctness of those who, in the mid 1950s, stood up for the “trench truth”. At the end of the 1960s the loud film Liberation and dozens of its imitations again turned war films towards the “global” aspect. Again the dear Generalissimo walked across the screen, puffing away at his pipe. Again he moved troops and armies and divisions on a huge map, or – to use a fine expression by Alexander Solzhenitsyn – “with a short crawl of a fat finger”. The spectators first were touched by the return of the Great Leader. However, this affection did not last long, and from the 1970s the history of our war cinema remembered not “Flames”, “Sokolovo” and innumerable “Fronts”… Instead, we revered Gherman’s forbidden “Trial on the Road”, and “Twenty Days without War”, Larissa Shepitko’s “Ascent” – all films of the “local” prespective.Today, the situation is even stranger. The love for the globe’s owner seems to leap up again with unearthly force and on the screen, people, their sufferings, their passions have finally replaced the statuesque monumentalism of high offices and important puffing away at the pipe.Therefore, before the appearance of Bondarchuk’s “Stalingrad”, it makes sense to remember both the outstanding films of the “local” kind, and the films unfairly forgotten by a whimsical history and a no less whimsical spectator – and be moved by the young Kvasha in the film “At a Difficult Hour”, and the no less young Lithuanian Adomaitis in the Belarusian “Eastern Corridor”… What about it! In all honesty, who of the contemporary filmmakers has seen “Fate of a Man” or “Ivan’s Childhood “in a cinema? I fear that nobody has.Having looked at our remarkable war films made over the past half-century, it is also appropriate to remember “The Ninth Company” and “Inhabited Island” in order to understand that Bondarchuk Junior tries in these films, like Stolper in “The Living and the Dead”, to connect the “global” view at war with the “local” view. Sometimes it works better than other times. We hope that Sergei Bondarchuk’s son will soon release a colour film in 3D that could be shown in a single screening with one of the greatest Soviet films, “Fate of a Man”.

Sergei Lavrentiev
Curator of the program, film historian and critic

FATE OF A MAN
Director Sergey Bondarchuk
USSR, 1959, 12+

AT A DIFFICULT HOUR
Director Ilya Gurin
USSR, 1961, 12+

IVAN'S CHILDHOOD
Director Andrey Tarkovsky
USSR, 1962, 12+

THE LIVING AND THE DEAD
Director Alexander Stolper
USSR, 1963, 12+

EASTERN CORRIDOR
Director Valentin Vinogradov
USSR, 1966, 16+

A WOMAN'S KINGDOM
Director Alexey Saltykov
USSR, 1967, 16+

TRIAL ON THE ROAD
Director Alexey German
USSR, 1971, 12+

FALLING STARS
Director Igor Talankin
USSR, 1981, 12+



THE YEAR OF THE NETHERLANDS AT KINOTAVR

DUTCH SHORTS

Following an established tradition, the year of the Netherlands is marked at Kinotavr by a program of short films. This time we present the prize-winners of a Dutch film festival. Created in 1981 at the initiative of the outstanding director Jos Stelling, this film event takes place in Utrecht every autumn. The fourth in size and the most ancient city of the Netherlands, Utrecht has probably been especially chosen as the place for a national film festival which has called itself rather modestly “Netherlands Film Days” (Nederlandse Filmdagen) and was conceived as a quite limited event for national cinematographers. But soon the event attracted attention not only of cinematographers, but also of spectators from different countries, and for its 25th anniversary has gathered 100,000 visitors. Now it is a significant festival, with a serious jury and prestigious awards. Its main prize, the Golden Calf, is awarded not only to full-length fiction films, but also to documentary, television, and short films. The serious attitude to short films in the Netherlands was eloquently expressed in 1996: Jos Stelling himself took part in the shorts competition, on a par with other debutant directors – and won the main prize. His witty sketch “The Waiting Room” reveals his skill, not in terms of the work of a master, but as one of the finest and most courageous films of the program. As far as one can judge from the anthology of winners of the shorts that was released in 2005 and represents a survey of 25 years, the selectors and the jury of the Netherlands Film Days are open to all genres, and also encourage their mix. A special place in the program is taken by docu-drama, where significant social and personal issues are expressed liberally and with irony, reminding us of the film-projection of a new novel (“Next Year in Holysloot”) or a surrealist Bunuel-like approach (“Memoirs without Battles and Other Deaths”). Puppets from the marionette theatre, which are inserted into the fabric of fiction film (“Metro”), were a metaphor for vandalism in the modern world and an experiment with overlapping languages of the two arts. Masterful animation (“Once Again”) is an anti-Utopia deprived of didacticism, where the reflection about the world after a nuclear catastrophe is presented in a grotesquely absurdist key. And, of course, many films of debutant directors are made on the theme of whether it is easy to be young, about cruelty, about vulnerability, about the search for the self in creativity and in love, and about how insignificant all these conflicts with the world are when facing the fact that life ends suddenly. Presenting the program of Dutch shorts, it is a pleasure to thank Herman de Witt, the former program director of the festival and member of the selection committee of Netherlands Film Days, for his assistance in obtaining the films and for his invaluable consultation; and also to Stepan Shushkalov for checking the Russian transliteration of Dutch names.

Natalia Nusinova
Russian program curator

ONCE AGAIN
Director Hans Nassenstein
The Netherlands, 1982, 16+

NEXT YEAR IN HOLYSLOOT
Director Emile van Moerkerken
The Netherlands, 1983, 16+

SOSTENU’ TO
Director Armand Perrenet
The Netherlands, 1987, 16+

MEMORIES WITHOUT BATTLES AND OTHER DEATHS
Director Nathalie Alonso Casale
The Netherlands, 1992, 16+

WAITING ROOM
Director Jos Stelling
The Netherlands, 1996, 16+

METRO
Director Eric Steegstra
The Netherlands, 1999, 16+

AN INTENSELY REALISTIC YET ROMANTIC LOVE STORY
Director Jesse de Jong
The Netherlands, 2000, 16+

ALFRED MAASSEN’S LAST DAY
Director David Lammers
The Netherlands, 2001, 16+

IMGARD’S DELIGHT
Director Ellen Blom
The Netherlands, 2003, 16+

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